• Exhibits

    Artifact of the Week: Nickel Silver Spoon

    This nickel silver spoon was manufactured by Rogers Co. This pattern, called plain, was available through the Sears and Roebuck catalog. Archaeologists recovered this spoon from Block 112 in Downtown San Diego. The promise of growth resulting from a connection…

  • Exhibits

    Artifact of the Week: Semi-Porcelain Bowl

    Archaeologists recovered this fancy semi-porcelain bowl from an excavation of Block 112, which housed a working class population during the late Victorian period (c.1880-1915). Block 112 was located between J and I (now Island) streets and 6th and 7th streets…

  • Exhibits

    Artifact of the Week: Sugar Tongs

    These silver plated sugar tongs were manufactured by Ingersoll. Archaeologists recovered them from an excavation of Block 112, a section of Downtown San Diego that housed a working class population during the late Victorian period (c. 1880-1915). This small section…

  • Exhibits

    Artifact of the Week: Hand Chopper and Knife

    Many of the stone tools would have had handles made of wood or bone. However, these materials do not last over time. These modern handles were recreated based on historical information. Only a small portion of history is preserved in…

  • Exhibits

    Artifact of the Week: Polishing Stones

    Pottery first appears in the archaeological record during the Late Holocene. The people of the Late Prehistoric Tradition made pots to store water, foodstuffs, and personal items. The pottery was created with the coiling technique, and the polishing stones were…

  • Exhibits

    Artifact of the Week: Cooking Stone

    Cooking stones were heated in embers and then placed into pots with a stick inserted into the hole. The heat would cook the food in the pot. The people of the Late Prehistoric Tradition did not have (nor need) the…